Archive for April, 2018


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Derek Walcott: A Poetic Genius

By: Arose N Daghetto for Literature Voodoo blog

 

Born in Saint Lucia in 1930, Derek Walcott was a poet whose writings thrived on challenging the human mind and social consciousness. His poetry unveiled the marriage between the beauty of the islands and its continual growing pains of post colonialism.

Walcott gave readers candid and sometimes dreamy perspectives of life through the eyes of Caribbean men and women. He paired his poetry with his artwork which further indulged readers with visuals of those perspectives. He enabled readers to breathe in the spirit of these characters. We get to walk in the characters’ shoes. We feel their love or their heartbreak. We experience their wins and grieve along with them during their losses. And because Derek Walcott’s work often included excerpts of his personal life experiences, we are given the opportunity to become acquainted with the man behind the poetry.

In Hilton Als’s tribute article to the late poet entitled, “Derek Walcott, A Mighty Poet Has Died” (The New Yorker, March 17, 2017), Als fondly recanted his interview with Walcott:

“I felt as though I had always known him- not known him, exactly, but seen him, been in his aura, his history…”

Als used many positive words to describe who Derek Walcott was. One of those words was complex. Although one might question how could saying a person is complex be positive, if you read his article (provided below)*, you will see where he meant it in a good way.

Derek Walcott was complex. He was complex in the sense of creativity and intellectualism. He was a poet, painter, playwright and journalist. Intellectually, he was a Nobel Prize laureate, a professor at Boston University, which is one of North America’s leading Ivy league schools. He was also the founder of the Boston Playwright Theater. Furthermore, he was honored by The Order of the Caribbean Community, The Order of Chivalry and The Most Excellent Order by Queen Elizabeth II, who elevated his name to Sir Derek Walcott. These are only some of the many credentials and high honors Walcott received during the course of his prestigious writing career.

Not enough people have heard about the genius known as Derek Walcott, especially those of the younger generation. I didn’t know who Derek Walcott was either. A beautiful friend I once knew introduced me to his poetry several months ago.

There is still more to learn about this poetic genius. A humble genius who often used his gift to mentor and advocate other upcoming writers. His poetry did more than just earn him a place on the elite list of world literature’s greatest writers of all time, it secured his place there. Like Chaucer, Homer and Shakespeare, Derek Walcott’s masterpieces should be on the syllabus of every middle school, high school and college English classes.

Derek Walcott wore many hats in his lifetime before and after he became a world renowned poet. The genius may be gone physically, but his voice will live on forever through every book he wrote and every legacy he left behind. Long live Derek Walcott. Long live Saint Lucia. Stay beautiful and never give up on your hard work for a better tomorrow.

 

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“Doubt was his patron saint, it was his island’s,
the saint who probed the holes in his Saviour’s hands”

“(despite the parenthetical rainbow of providence)
and questioned resurrection; its seven bright bands.”

“Saint Thomas, the skeptic, Saint Lucia, the blind
martyr who on a tray carried her own eyes,”

“the hymn of black smoke, wreath of the trade wind,
confirming their ascent to paradise. “

 

~ Tiepolo’s Hound by Derek Walcott, 2000

 

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* Hilton Alt’s article:
https://www.newyorker.com/culture/culture-desk/derek-walcott-a-mighty-poet-has-died

 

*****Disclaimer*****

All photos, drawings and writings belonging to other artists featured on this blog are solely for entertainment or illustrational purposes only. I do not own nor do I have any desire to take credit for any photos, artwork or writings not belonging to me. They all belong to the rightful owners of the work and the original websites they came from.

This excludes my own personal writings and photos I share on this blog which are always indicated and credited under my name and periodical company.

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Word of the Week: Ouai

 

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“Ouai” (pronounced Ooo-wehy)  means “Yeah” in French. It is an informal alternative to “Yes”. It is best used among people you know personally like friends and family. You might come off as rude or disrespectful if you answer someone you don’t know this way, like an elder, a customer or a teacher.

 

Example:

 

Hot Babe: Tu veux aller au cinéma ce soir ou pas?

(Do you want to go to the movies tonight or not?)

Badass Boyfriend: (Runs his fingers through his immaculate hair.) Ouai.  (Yeah.)

Let’s say it together!

• Tu veux aller au cinéma ce soir ou pas?

(Too voo zah-lehy oh see-nehy-mah suh swah ooo pah?)

• Ouai.

(Ooo-wehy)

 

Now you have a new word to add to your everyday conversation! Have fun, impress your friends!

See you next week with another word…🙋

~Arose N Daghetto

 

 

 

 

*****Disclaimer*****  

All photos, drawings and writings belonging to other artists featured on this blog are solely for entertainment and illustrational purposes only. I do not own nor do I have any desire to take credit for any photos, artwork or writings not belonging to me. They all belong to the rightful owners of the work and the original websites they came from. 

This excludes my own personal writings and photos I share on this blog which are always indicated and credited under my name and periodical company.

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What can you expect to see on the new and improved Literature Voodoo? Lesser poems. More cultural articles. More concise. It’s that simple.

• Articles will cover a variety of topics related to the literary arts. They will be engaging, entertaining and reader friendly.

• Profiles on language, spirituality, and other forms of entertainment from cultures around the world, especially those of the African diaspora

• Word of the week

•  Writing tips and resources to help writers succeed further in their writing goals

• And more!

Here’s to breathing new life into this website. Sending positive enlightenment to every person this blog reaches.

Ase.   🙏

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Stay tuned.

~Arose N Daghetto

 

*****Disclaimer*****  

All photos, drawings and writings belonging to other artists featured on this blog are solely for entertainment and illustrational purposes only. I do not own nor do I have any desire to take credit for any photos, artwork or writings not belonging to me. They all belong to the rightful owners of the work and the original websites they came from. 

This excludes my own personal writings and photos I share on this blog which are always indicated and credited under my name and periodical company.

Arose N Daghetto, Koté ou yé??

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Hola! Coucou! Bom dia! Bonjou/Bonswa! Bienvenue! Hello everybody! I see you out there. 👀

I’ve noticed an increase in people visiting Literature Voodoo lately. I want to say thank you for visiting my page. Thank you for the likes, shares and follows over the years. I appreciate your presence, even if you don’t comment or share. It means a lot that you took the time out of your day or night to stop by. 🙏

So, Koté ou yé?? Where are you, Arose N Daghetto??

Koté’m yé (Where am I)? Life happened. I developed a long term writers block which forced me to stop writing. I also became a caregiver/(volunteer) CNA to several important people in my life. As a result, I denounced being a writer because not only was I way too busy to write anything, I also fell out of love with writing. I didn’t want to be a writer anymore. I took all the notebooks of stories and poetry I wrote and packed them in a garbage bag. I pulled all my websites up and was about to hit the delete permanently button one by one when something stopped me. I was impelled to take a little more time to think things over before I got rid of everything.

A month later a poem came to me. I wrote the poem and posted it on my Facebook page. A few days later, a short essay. Then nothing for about three or four months. Then a short story came to me. Half way into my first short story came another.

I did some soul searching in between the people I’ve been caring for. I realized that the writer within was still very much alive and wasn’t ready to call it quits… at least for now. So today, little by little, I’m back to work. Back to my original first and only love.

I’ve been working on improving my writing, building my writing resume and working on new material. You will be seeing new things soon. Bigger and better things but more concise. I hope you stay tuned and come back again in the near future. 🙂

Ti prosima vez! Until next time… see you soon.

Much love,

Arose N Daghetto

 

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*****Disclaimer*****  

All photos, drawings and writings belonging to other artists featured on this blog are solely for general use or illustrational purposes only. I do not own nor do I have any desire to take credit for any photos, artwork or writings not belonging to me. They all belong to the rightful owners of the work and the original websites they came from. 

This excludes my own personal writings and photos I share on this blog which are always indicated and credited under my name and periodical company.

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